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INDEPENDENT ADVISORY BOARD FIRST MEETING

The What Works Independent Advisory Board (IAB) met for the first time in December 2014 in London. Its role to provide independent strategic advice and quality assurance to ensure What Works produces the highest calibre of research.
 
The meeting was chaired by Dr Claudia Garcia-Moreno of the World Health Organization, and brought together Riet Groenen, UN Women, Mendy Marsh, UNICEF, Jennifer McCleary-Sills, World Bank, and Sapana Pradhan Malla, Senior Advocate and Former Member of the Constituent Assembly.

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what works CALLS FOR UN and world bank to HELP drive global support for VAWG prevention

What Works has been shaping understanding of the underlying factors that lead to violence against women and girls, and pushing a global movement of support for prevention activities, via meetings with the United Nations and the World Bank.

Representatives from all three components of the What Works programme, including Dr Emma Fulu from the South African Medical Research Council, and Dr Jeannie Annan from the International Rescue Committee and Stella Mukasa from ICRW, led a series of learning sessions in New York in February.

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  • PREVENTION THROUGH RESPONSE MECHANISMS: A DFID Learning eventread more
  • WHAT WORKS INDUCTION MEETING STRENGTHENS PREVENTION PROGRAMMESread more
  • What Works FOR RESEARCH UPTAKEread more
  • PRESS WRAP UPread more

prevention projects in 16 countries funded through what works

18 ground breaking projects and research programmes to help prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG) across 16 countries have been awarded grants ranging between £450,000 to £1 million to implement and test cutting-edge approaches to stopping violence before it starts with funding from the UK Department for International Development.
 
The Global Programme, through its Innovation Grant scheme, will support ten projects across Africa, Asia and the Middle East and will additionally evaluate a further eight interventions. On December 10, 2014, at the launch of the grants scheme, at DFID Headquarters in the UK, the International Development Minister, Baroness Northover said:
 
“Violence against women and girls is a global epidemic. Though some societies have made more progress than others, we must all work together to end it. These are really exciting projects and thanks to the boost from UK funding they will help improve the lives of women and girls in some of the poorest countries.”

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RESOURCES

Website

The What Works programmes official website is now live, go to www.whatworks.co.za to find information on all three components, and to access new research and materials on violence prevention.


RESEARCH

The Journal of Adolescent Health has released a special issue dedicated to Interventions to Prevent and Reduce Rates of Teen Dating Violence. Articles cover issues on how to build a culture of health and promoting healthy relationships, prevalence studies and evaluations of different approaches and models used. Access here.
 

In-country technical advisory groups set

 

Component 2 of the What Works programme is focused on building knowledge on VAWG in humanitarian emergencies.  For this, it is critical for research to be operationally relevant from the outset, and for the programme’s teams to be engaged with policymakers, researchers, and practitioners at community, national, and international levels, and to meaningfully involve them throughout the project.
 
Stakeholder mapping carried out during the Inception Phase led to the establishment of in-country Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) in Kenya and South Sudan. The TAGs will provide technical input on research questions, on ethical and safety measures, and dissemination and uptake strategies.
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NEW STUDY TO BETTER UNDERSTAND GBV IN SOUTH SUDAN

South Sudan secured independence in July 2011 after a decade-long conflict, but only two years later, the country erupted into violence again amid a power struggle between the South Sudanese president and vice president. The renewed violence has displaced more than one million people.

In addition to this ongoing civil war lies another layer of violence in South Sudan; women are suffering from rape, beatings and domestic abuse.
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REDUCING STIGMA AMONG SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN DRC

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) survivors of sexual violence face rejection from their families and are at heightened risk of poor mental health as the result of such trauma.    Women who experience stigma from their families and communities may also be less likely to have a steady income as their partners may ostracize them from their homes or be unable to access money to start a small business.  The negative economic and mental health effects of stigma from sexual violence are compounded in Eastern DRC, which is typified by pervasive poverty, inequitable gender norms, and insecurity.
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work to explore social and economic impacts of vawg BEGINS

On February 11, Component Three of the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Programme began its focus to explore the social and economic impacts of violence against women and girls in the Global South and to provide a framework for estimating the overall costs for national economies. 
 
The launch was held at NUI Galway in the Aula Maxima Lower, it was open to the public.
 
Speakers included:
  • Jim Browne, President, NUI Galway
  • Katie Chapman, Social Development Advisor, Violence against Women and Girls Team, DFID
  • Liz Ford, Deputy Editor, Global Development, The Guardian
  • Anne Byrne, Head, School of Political Science & Sociology, NUI Galway
  • Nata Duvvury, Project Leader, Centre for Global Women’s Studies, NUI Galway
COMPONENT THREE SETS TECHNICAL ADVISORY GROUP

A Technical Advisory Group (TAG) has been formed to provide guidance and enrichment to Component Three activities, they include:
 
CHAIR:
Prof Maria Floro of American University, Washington DC http://www.american.edu/cas/faculty/mfloro.cfm
 
MEMBERS:
Dr. Anne Byrne, Head of School of Sociology and Political Science at the National University of Ireland, Galway
http://www.nuigalway.ie/soc/

Liz Ford, Deputy Editor The Guardian's Global development website.
http://www.theguardian.com/profile/lizford
Dr. Arístides Alfredo Vara-Horna, Director of Research Institute of the Faculty of Administrative Sciences and Human Resources at San Martín de Porres University, Perú 
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Aristides_Vara_Horna
 
Professor Charlotte Watts, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, is Head of the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group and founding director of the Gender Violence and Health Centre
http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/aboutus/people/watts.charlotte
 
Dr. Quentin Wodon, Adviser, Education Department, World Bank
http://blogs.worldbank.org/team/quentin-wodon
 

CONTACT US
To find out more about each individual component of the What Works programme:
 
What Works: The Global Programme
Email: whatworkscommunications@gmail.com
Twitter: @WhatWorksVAWG
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatWorksVAWG

What Works: VAWG in Conflict and Humanitarian Crises
Email: whatworkscomp2@rescue.org

What Works: Economic and SOcial Costs of VAWG
Email: whatworkscomp3@gmail.com

 
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