Copy
View this email in your browser

CFP: “Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200–1450” (11–14 May 20-17: Kalamazoo)

Papers are sought for two sessions, “Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200–1450 (I–II),” to be held at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017, sponsored by the International Centre of Medieval Art, and convened by Stefania Gerevini and Tom Nickson.
 
Light has occupied an increasingly prominent role in medieval studies in recent years. Its perceptual and epistemic significance in the period 1200-1450 has been scrutinized in several specialised research projects, and the changing ways in which light and light-effects are rendered and produced in the arts of the Middle Ages, particularly in Byzantium and Islam, are routinely evoked in literature. However, scholarship on these topics remains fragmented, especially for the Gothic period, and comparative approaches are seldom attempted. New technologies of virtual reconstruction and changing fashions of museum display make it an opportune moment to consider these issues in a more systematic manner.
 
These two sessions will investigate how perceptions of light and darkness informed the ways in which art across Europe and the Mediterranean was produced, viewed and understood in the period 1200–1450. In the late 12th century a key set of optical writings was translated from Arabic into Latin, providing new theoretical paradigms for addressing questions of physical sight and illumination across Europe. At this time theologies of light also gained renewed popularity in the eastern Mediterranean – particularly as a result of the Hesychast controversy in Byzantium, and in connection with Sufi notions of divine illumination in Islam. What correlations can be traced between theories of optics, theologies of light, practices of illumination, and modes of viewing in the Middle Ages? Are there similarities in the ways different religious or cultural communities conceptualised light and used it in everyday life or ritual settings?
 
These sessions invite specialists of Christian, Islamic and Jewish art and culture to explore the status of light in broader discourses around visuality, visibility and materiality; the interconnections between conceptualizations of light and coeval attitudes towards objectivity and naturalism; and the ways in which light can articulate political, social or divine authority and hierarchies. The session will also welcome papers that address such broad methodological questions as: can the investigation of light in art prompt reconsideration of well established periodizations and interpretative paradigms of art history? How was the dramatic interplay between light and obscurity exploited in the secular and religious architecture of Europe and the medieval Mediterranean in order to organise space, direct viewers and convey meaning? How carefully were light effects taken into account in the display of images and portable objects, and how does consideration of luminosity, shadow and darkness hone our understanding of the agency of medieval objects? Finally, to what extent is light’s ephemeral and fleeting nature disguised by changing fashions of display and technologies of reproduction, and – crucially – how do these affect our ability to apprehend and explain medieval approaches to light?
 
Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2015 to the session organizers: Stefania Gerevini (stefania.gerevini@unibocconi.it) and Tom Nickson (tom.nickson@courtauld.ac.uk). Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN
www.courtauld.ac.uk

Source: Tom Nickson, Courtauld Institute of Ar

This message is being sent to Associates of the Mediterranean Seminar (www.mediterraneanseminar.org); you may have received it as a forwarded message.
Excuse duplicate and cross-postings.
Please distribute widely.

The Mediterranean Seminar provides announcements of grants, fellowships, conferences, programs and events for third party institutions on a courtesy basis as we become aware of them. Any inquiries regarding such announcements should be made directly to the organizing party as listed in the announcement in question; the Mediterranean Seminar is not responsible for and does not provide any guarantee or warranty regarding these programs, their content, or the timing or accuracy of the information provided. All announcements are archived at: www.mediterraneanseminar.org.

To unsubscribe, click on the unsubscribe link in this email. You may unsubscribe and remain an Associate; unless you indicate otherwise we will assume this is the case. If you would like to be removed as a Mediterranean Studies associate, have received this message in error, would like to join the Mediterranean Seminar, or have inquiries, please contact mailbox(at)mediterraneanseminar.org. To subscribe click here.

You can update your user profile and email address here.






This email was sent to <<*Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Mediterranean Seminar · Institute for Humanities Research · 1156 High St · Santa Cruz, CA 95064 · USA