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Weekly snippets of open data stuff.
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MEDIA MILL GAZETTE: FIFTEEN

OPEN DATA: GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO GO MUCH FURTHER

More Government support for open data after last weeks national action plan and previous moves like the Defra data dump announcement.
This time it's Cabinet Office minister Matthew Hancock who bangs the drum for the transparency and innovation benefits of open data. The full speech is worth a read, through the usual rhetoric of deficit reduction,  open data as cost cutting rather than innovation. That's a rhetoric I'd like to see challenged more. Government should release data but the impact needs to be tested. 

REAL TIME ENERGY USE FROM LOCAL COUNCILS

One of the projects that Hancock mentioned in his speech was Windsor and Maidenhead council, which publishes real-time data on its energy use. Apparently it's helped cut energy bills by 16 percent. At one level you'd think councils would/could/should be using data (open or not) to do this kind of thing, His citing of the London Fire Brigade raise similar questions about general levels of data savviness beyond open data. But the openness of this and the innovation is worth supporting .

ODI AWARDS


The ODI held their second Open Data awards this week " celebrating a generation of network thinkers who are changing the world with open data.". The winners make for an interesting list but the shortlist is also worth a look. One thing that struck me was the international focus - a good thing and certainly reflecting the broader idea of open data as an international development tool that puts transparency on the agenda. It's a view thats echoes in a number of places, not least government with it's membership of the open data partnership and, to a lesser extent, the conservative governments manifesto pledge to share tax data with developing countries. An international angle is one that clearly attracts funding and it's one thats worth at least some development time for open data companies beyond the usual transport and location apps. 

Plenty of write ups around including this one from Forbes. 

NESTA FUND FOR HYPERLOCAL AUDIENCE ANALYTICS


Nest have announced that they have a new pot of Destination Local funding to "help hyperlocal publishers overcome the barriers to employing audience analytics as a fundamental part of their service" There's funding for up to 10 projects, up to £6,500 each.

MONEY FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES TO USE SATELLITE DATA


"Government has made a total of £700,000 funding available in the first phase of a competition to help local authorities create sustainable services based on satellite data. "

The money comes from  InnovateUK and the Small Business Research Initiative (part of innovateUK) and looks really interesting.

Applicants must 
register to apply by noon on 9 September.

CIVIC OPEN DATA AT A CROSSROADS: DOMINANT MODELS AND CURRENT CHALLENGES


An interesting (no really) academic paper which "outlines four main models for how government delivers open data; data over the wall, code exchange, civic issue tracker, and participatory open data." There's a link to a pre-press version on this blog post by one of the authors because, ironically, the actual paper is behind a paywall (academia and open data!)

HYPERLOCAL AND PRESS REGULATION


A really interesting post from Nick Booth (via Paul Bradshaw) that tries to get to the bottom of the legal impact on hyperlocals of Leveson (and the fall out). This is really important as a number of  bloggers, single issue sites often find themselves becoming hyperlocal news services as the audience gravitates to an engaged local source - perhaps that its because the line is so blurred that we should be more aware of how easy it might be to cross it

EVENT: CREATING ENGAGED CITIZENS AND USERS WITH OPEN DATA


Open Data Sheffield have got a bigger room for their event next Monday, so more tickets are available. Worth a look (and not a trek to London!)

CONSUMERS DIRTY DATABASES WITH FALSE INFORMATION


"People are deliberately giving brands false data about themselves to protect their privacy, and are ignoring brands’ efforts to empower them to take control of their data, according to a study of more than 2,400 UK consumers by research company Verve."

The article reinforces what we already know (and perhaps do) that people will lie or at the very least enter anything to get through a survey. The stats are sobering but there's a nice spin in the article around the Governments Midata initiative which is meant to help (but harley anyone knows about) that makes it worth a read through. 
The Media Mill Gazette is an output from Innovate UK and NESTA funded Media Mill Project   



Copyright © 2015 Media Innovation Studio at the University of Central Lancashire, All rights reserved.


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