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A University of Southern California study focused on understanding the impact of “Rapid Fire Media” indicates that social media and other forms of technology not only limit opportunities to assess verbal cues but also the time it takes to develop emotional attachment.
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Connect with Kids  

November 2014

IN THIS ISSUE: DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
RESEARCH & NEWS .  LEARN MORE.  FAMILY VIEWING GUIDE.  VIDEOS AND LESSON PLANS.

Intimacy:  A Face-to-Face Skill that Screens Can’t Teach
Intimacy.  It's defined as a close personal relationship and is synonymous with words like friendship, affection, and rapport. Experts say it is one of the most important skills learned in adolescence, but now warn that too much time on social media may threaten the art of developing close, deep connections with another human being. 

According to a recent study out of UCLA, the pervasive usage of digital media, which is typically text-based and excludes nonverbal emotional cues, can diminish the in-person experiences that young people need to master social skills.  Even when media is used to communicate socially and includes technologies like Face Time, Skype, and video chat, the skills necessary to develop intimate connections may be lost

Learning intimacy requires understanding nuances of human behavior and expression which can only be gained from in-person interactions. In the Connect with Kids documentary, First Comes Love, psychologist Robert Perez reiterates the importance of children and adolescents spending time with one another, "What we want people to learn how to do is talk," he said. "We want people to learn how to deal with their feelings, and ideally we want them to learn how to deal with their feelings at a verbal level."

Learning how to “talk” and deal with feelings at an intimate level not only requires understanding and responding to non-verbal cues but also includes spending significant amounts of “real” time with another human being.

Intimacy Takes Time
University of Southern California study focused on understanding the impact of “Rapid Fire Media” indicates that social media and other forms of technology not only limit opportunities to assess verbal cues but also the time it takes to develop emotional attachment. 

According to the USC researchers, it takes time and reflection to develop feelings like compassion or admiration that are based on moral values. But this kind of time is lost in the fast-paced world of digital media.  

The emotional toll of frequent exposure to a rapid flow of media and information through television, computer, tablet and smart phone screens is explored by the study. They warn that it could thwart the development of a strong moral compass.


The New Dating Game
Many believe that this concern is manifesting itself in the new world of teen and college dating.  The New York Times raised the issue in 2013 with the article “
The End of Courtship.”  Now others cite apps like Tinder and MyLOL to lament the lost opportunities for teens and twenty-somethings to understand and find meaning in intimate friendships and romantic relationships. The problem has long-term implications not just for the individual but for society as well.  Studies have shown that adolescents who fail to develop skills of intimacy may be more inclined to suffer from a low self-esteem and depression, ultimately curbing their ability to function at full capacity. Adolescents who seek out these kinds of relationships online can also expose themselves to great danger by using social media to meet up with strangers.
 

LEARN MORE
Kids & Screen Time: Cutting Through the Static, NPR

Five days at outdoor education camp without screens improves preteen skills with nonverbal emotional cues, Journal of Computer in Behavior


The effects of text, audio, video and in-person communication on bonding between friends, Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberpsychology


TIP SHEET: Kids & Screen Time
HOW CAN PARENTS & SCHOOLS HELP?

Explore CWK resources for strategies on strategies on how to help parents and teachers talk to teens about the dangers of the internet.

PREVIEW VIDEO
INTERNET GENERATION

DOWNLOAD INTERNET GENERATION FAMILY VIEWING GUIDE


PARENT GUIDE: SOCIAL MEDIA & INTERNET SAFETY

WEBSOURCE & CUSTOM CLIENTS: Please explore the following featured resources on DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP

FACEBOOK DEPRESSION

THE EMPATHY DEFICIT

SCREEN ADDICTS

 


WEBSOURCE
Websource is the Connect with Kids online library which includes 300 reality-based streaming videos that are 3-8 minutes in length, lesson plans with discussion questions, parent tip sheets, family viewing guides, professional development videos with assessments. Click HERE To learn more about how your school can access Websource.



CUSTOM WEBSITES
Custom Websites & Online Programming provide a common platform for the district or school that houses all information about social/emotional learning and mental health. The Connect with Kids team works with the district to develop and streamline a communications strategy to inform parents, teachers and students about all the resources available.
Copyright © 2014 Connect with Kids, All rights reserved.


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Connect with Kids is based out of Atlanta, Georgia and has been in business for over 15 years.  We own one of the nation’s largest evidence-based, non-fiction video libraries on student behavior and parent engagement and address issues such as bullying and violence prevention, character and life skills, attendance and achievement, health and wellness, digital citizenship, drug and alcohol prevention and college and career readiness.   Our company works with school districts to assess their needs in these areas and builds custom websites with video programs; lesson plans and parent resources that are accessible to the entire community including all parents.  Connect with Kids is listed as an Effective Producer of Programs on the U.S. Department of Education's What Works Clearinghouse List and is also listed on the  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) and the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP).