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Disciples Immigration Legal Update

Provided by Immigration Legal Counsel, a ministry of Disciples Home Missions

March 10, 2016
photo credit: CoolClips
Did you know?
 
1. That fancy-looking visa in your passport isn’t what lets you stay in the U.S. Rather, this humble I-94 card determines how long you can stay.
                                           
                                          visa                        I-94
 
2. Speaking of I-94’s, if you travel to the U.S. by plane, you might not even get an I-94 card anymore. Instead, you can go to this website to print it out.  
                                      
 
3. Undocumented men between the ages of 18 and 25 are still required to register with the Selective Service. If you don’t, you could have issues when you apply for citizenship later.
                                              

4. Even if you’ve had your green card for 50 years, you could still be deported if you commit a crime or stay outside the U.S. too long. Citizenship is the only thing that truly protects you from deportation. Learn more. 
                                              

5. The Department of Homeland Security might google you when you apply for a green card or other immigration benefit. So clean up those Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and other accounts.
                                             

6. Undocumented immigrants pay billions in state and local taxes. 
                                                

7. If you miss a court date, an immigration judge can order you deported, even if you’re not there. It is called an in absentia order.
                                                 

8. Even telling someone which immigration form to fill out is illegal unless you are an attorney or representative accredited by the Board of Immigration Appeals. But there are plenty of other ways to help.
                                                 

9. If you are a student, working too much or in the wrong place can make you deportable. It also means you’ll have to leave the U.S. before you can change to a work or other kind of visa. Learn more.  
                                                  

10. Some young adults with DACA might be able to apply for a green card after traveling on advance parole.
                                                    


 
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