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Dear Friend,

My wife and I were in our thirties, the parents of three children under the age of nine, when Susan found a red spot on her breast. It was assessed as triple negative breast cancer—a particularly virulent form of the disease. Like all newly diagnosed cancer patients, we were thrust into a frightening new world—one we had not chosen and one in which we felt we did not belong.

The journey from that day on has not been easy or smooth. Little did I know at the time that Susan and I would face the cancer diagnosis again and again—with Susan being diagnosed with five different types of cancer in the next 30 years.

We saw firsthand how managing cancer symptoms and treatment side effects like pain and peripheral neuropathy, dealing with the financial effects, and dealing with key issues like fear, hope, and spirituality were not often addressed by her treatment providers.

That’s why in my role with the Samueli Foundation, I have brought together leaders in oncology to forge a better path forward for patients. The series of resources and pocket guides within this email are part of that effort. More to come in the months and year ahead, but for now, I hope you will share these widely with those you love. Cancer will soon be the number one cause of death in the country and has affected nearly every family I’ve ever treated, so we need this information now more than ever.

Be well.

Dr. Wayne Jonas
The Pocket Guide to Cancer Pain

Pain is a common cancer side effect. At least 20 to 50 percent of people with cancer report having pain.

Cancer pain can be caused by injury to the nerves, cancer spreading to the bones or other structures in the body, and inflammation.

Medications are the most common solution offered for cancer pain, but are not your only option. Ask your doctor about ways to manage cancer pain besides medications. It’s OK to think outside the box when it comes to cancer pain. Learn more by downloading the guide.

The Pocket Guide to Nutrition and Cancer

Food choices following a cancer diagnosis can feel as important as treatment decisions. Eating well during treatment and beyond means listening to your body’s healing intuition.

Food can help heal the body, mind, and spirit and contribute to whole-person healing. Download the guide to learn more.

The Pocket Guide to Movement and Cancer

Aerobic endurance, strength, and flexibility are important benefits of being physically active during and after treatment. Endorphins released during exercise can reduce pain, while fresh air and solitude can provide a break from feeling like a patient rather than a person.

Yoga, tai chi, and other gentle forms of exercise can restore and even boost energy. Today, physical movement is recommended to virtually everyone who is receiving treatment or is a cancer survivor.

Dowload the guide now to discover excerices to help you heal.

From the Blog
Cancer Treatment and Nerve Problems
Read More
Can I Exercise with Cancer? Yes, and Here’s Why it’s a Good Idea
Read More
What to Eat When You Have Cancer
Read More
What to Do About Cancer Pain
Read More
RESOURCES
The Pocket Guide to Nutrition and Cancer
Food choices following a cancer diagnosis can feel as important as treatment decisions. Eating well during treatment and beyond means listening to your body’s healing intuition.
Watch Now
The Pocket Guide to Cancer Pain
Pain is a common cancer side effect. At least 20 to 50 percent of people with cancer report having pain. It can be caused by injury to the nerves, cancer spreading to the bones or other structures in the body, and inflammation.
Learn More
WHAT ARE WE READING
Health Journeys
How One VA Hospital Sold Its Veterans & Staff on Guided Imagery
Read More
MD Linx
Eating Walnuts Daily Lowered Bad Cholesterol and May Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Read More
MD Linx
Choosing Personal Exercise Goals, then Tackling Them Immediately is Key to Sustaining Change
Read More
Personal Health Inventory
Personal Health Inventory
Personal Self-Assessment

Download this one-sheet and fill it out before your next doctor visit, to help your health care provider assess your health and well-being from a whole-patient perspective.

Read More
How Healing Works
Get Well and Stay Well Using Your Hidden Power to Heal
Drawing on 40 years of research and patient care, Dr. Wayne Jonas explains how 80 percent of healing occurs organically and how to activate the healing process.
LEARN MORE
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Samueli Foundation, Integrative Health Programs · 1800 Diagonal Rd · Suite 617 · Alexandria, VA 22314 · USA