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Sunday, May 29th - Saturday, June 4th, 2022
In brief: Mayor Harrell unveiled his One Seattle Homelessness Action Plan, including a $118 investment in the King County Regional Homelessness Authority; the City Council passed its Pay Up Seattle ordinance, which will create a new minimum wage for app-based delivery drivers when it goes into effect next year; the City had to cancel roughly 200,000 parking tickets because of an administrative error; the Sound Transit board announced their pick for the agency's next CEO; and Pride Month officially kicked off. 
Editor's note: This week's newsletter has been triaged due to time constraints. Click here for the most recent Seattle Times COVID infographics. 
Top Stories
Mayor Harrell unveiled his One Seattle Homelessness Action Plan, including a landing page, homelessness.seattle.gov, which talks more about the root causes of the homelessness crisis, lays out the actions that the City is taking to reduce homelessness (including providing $118 million in funding to the King County Regional Homelessness Authority in 2023), and includes a heat map of tent encampments by neighborhood. [Publicola, KING 5, MyNorthwest]

The City Council passed its Pay Up Seattle ordinance, which will create a new minimum wage for app-based delivery drivers when it goes into effect next year. [Seattle Times, KING 5, MyNorthwest]

The City Council also passed legislation that will require landlords to report information about their rentals, including what they're charging for rent and whether the home is occupied, to the City twice per year. [Publicola, Seattle Times, MyNorthwest]

A California-based group filed a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn Washington's ban on high-capacity magazines, which was passed in this year's state legislative session and is set to go into effect on July 1st. [Seattle Times]

The City had to cancel and refund more than 200,000 parking tickets that were issued between September 1st and April 5th, leading to $4.5 - $5 million in lost revenue, because the Durkan administration didn't grant parking enforcement officers the legal authority to write parking tickets when their department was transitioned out of SPD last year following the City Council's attempt (after the 2020 protests) to cut SPD's budget on paper without laying off any officers. [Seattle Times, KING 5, MyNorthwest]

Sydney Brownstone from The Seattle Times and Ashley Hiruko from KUOW reported on an internal SPD memo from April raising a red flag about severe understaffing in the department's sexual assault division. [Seattle Times, KUOW]

Washington state hired a climate change epidemiologist to gain more insight into the ways in which wildfires and other local impacts of climate change will affect public health across the state. [Crosscut]

Sound Transit's board announced Julie Timm, currently the head of a smaller regional transit agency in Richmond, VA, as their pick to be Sound Transit's next CEO. [Seattle Times, Publicola, MyNorthwest]

And Pride Month officially kicked off in Seattle with a flag-raising event at City Hall Wednesday morning, and will culminate with PrideFest events the weekend of June 25th and 26th. [KING 5, EverOut Seattle]
Ending on a high note
A West Seattle woman was able to save a beloved neighborhood tree by convincing SDOT to change the location of a curb cut in the sidewalk. 

And stop-and-go Memorial Day traffic on I-90 heading to Eastern Washington, combined with a viral tweet by WSDOT, led to a small boy getting his beloved stuffed dinosaur back

Sol Villarreal
Broker, Windermere Real Estate
sol@windermere.com
solvillarreal.com
206-765-6108
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