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A collection of articles on gender, diversity and workplace flexibility brought to you by Exponential Talent.
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February 19, 2015

To advance our knowledge of diversity, inclusion, gender and workplace flexibility, we gather and share relevant articles on a weekly basis. This week, we have identified the following articles of interest.

We invite you to share these articles via e-mail, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

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Diversity & Inclusion – Focus on Gender Bias in the Language of Evaluation
 
Key findings from the article:
  • The creator of the tool, Ben Schmidt, "was struck by 'this spectrum from smart to brilliant to genius, where each one of those is more strongly gendered male than the previous one was.'"
  • "Men are more likely to be described as a starknowledgeableawesome or the best professor. Women are more likely to be described as bossydisorganizedhelpful [and unhelpful], annoying or [plays favorites]. Nice or rude are also more often used to describe women than men."
Notice that these reflect the current state of gender bias in evaluation: women are more often discussed in terms of personality attributes, whereas men are more often discussed in terms of their skills, results, and achievements.
 
The bolded words above are great search terms to try in the interactive chart tool, which can be found here. Some additional words to try:
  • friendly
  • incompetent
  • impressive
  • dumb
  • idiot
  • role model
Diversity & Inclusion
 
Key findings, as highlighted in the article by McKinsey staff Vivian Hunt, Dennis Layton, and Sara Prince:
  • Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians.
  • Companies in the top quartile for gender diversity are 15 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians.
  • While certain industries perform better on gender diversity and other industries on ethnic and racial diversity, no industry or company is in the top quartile on both dimensions.
You can find the full Diversity Matters study here.
 
 
Key findings, as identified in the report by PricewaterhouseCoopers:
  • Of the CEOs whose companies have a formal diversity and inclusiveness strategy, 85% think it’s improved the bottom line.
  • Three in ten CEOs say their orgs don’t have a strategy to promote diversity and inclusiveness, 13% say there are plans to adopt one.
You can find the full 18th Annual Global CEO Survey here.
 
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