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A collection of articles on diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy brought to you by Exponential Talent LLC.
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February 7, 2017

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Diversity & Inclusion
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BBC: How East and West Think in Profoundly Different Ways

Researchers are learning that one driver of the global diversity of thought is geographic location, and that location can influence what information our brain pays attention to and how it solves problems. Research also confirms these different thinking orientations are learned and not genetic. For example, a study in China shows that differences in collectivist or individualistic mindsets aligns to which crop is farmed: people in rice-farming areas focus on team work and wheat-farming regions have a stronger orientation to independence. Worldwide research in this area is expanding, helping us to better understand and appreciate all the wonderfully unique ways humans think.


SHRM and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute: The Growing Hispanic Demographic and the Workplace
 
Looking ahead to the decline in the US workforce as Baby Boomers retire (60% by 2060), the fast-growing Hispanic community will be critical to filling this gap. The report estimates that Hispanics will represent one of every two people entering the workforce by 2025. Educationally, 65% of jobs by 2020 will require post-secondary schooling or specialized training and Hispanics enroll in college at a rate equal to whites, positioning them to help meet this demand. Providing financial aid and other support for college, as well as support in the workplace to appreciate diversity, will pay rich dividends.

Focus on Gender
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New York Times: Why Women Quit Working: It’s Not for the Reasons Men Do

Women are part of the growing trend of “missing workers” in the US economy, those no longer looking for work thus not showing up in government unemployment numbers. Unlike other Western economies that offer supportive family policies, women’s economic destinies in the US are limited the lack of support for their caregiver responsibilities, unlike male “missing workers” who tend to be impacted by by criminal records or disabilities.


BloombergHigh-Earning Moms Get Socked With 10% ‘Motherhood Penalty’

While men get a “fatherhood bonus” of 6% for every child they have, women get a 4% “motherhood penalty” and, for high-skill, high-paid women workers, that penalty rises to 10% according to research published in the American Sociological Review. Earlier research found that among women with “high-honor” undergraduate or advanced degrees, 69% would not have left their jobs to raise a family if they had the flexibility to do both. But even when flexibility is there for women, exercising that benefit is not advantageous to them, as other workers perceive taking time off to care for children to be the equivalent of taking a vacation. 

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