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A collection of articles on diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy brought to you by Exponential Talent LLC.
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March 22, 2017

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Diversity & Inclusion
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Harvard Business Review: Black Employees Are More Likely To Be Promoted When They Were Referred by Another Employee

Research by Assistant Professors Jennifer Merluzzi (Tulane) and Adina Sterling (Stanford) studied promotions in a sales business over a 10 year period, and found that both women and Blacks experienced statistically fewer promotions than whites and males. However, they did find that Blacks who were hired through a referral by another employee had higher promotion rates (though not high enough to close the gap to whites.)  There was, however, no positive effect for women being hired through referrals.  Other research has shown that when a respected individual vouches for the capabilities and competence of a diverse employee, performance is assessed more positively, indicating bias has been disrupted. It is possible a similar effect is being observed in this study.

TV 2 Danmark All That We Share (3-minute video): Denmark public television developed this video to highlight to power of seeing past stereotypes. They write: "We live in a time where we quickly put people in boxes. Maybe we have more in common than what we think?"

Focus on Gender
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Entrepreneur: Why Gender Diversity In Tech Matters

The tech sector of the US economy makes up 7.1% of the country’s gross domestic product. However, U.S. colleges aren’t keeping up with the job growth in tech. Women are particularly underrepresented, earning just 18% of computer science degrees today versus 37% 20 years ago.  In addition, the highest-paying tech jobs in NY are overwhelmingly held by men (80%), while women hold the majority (60%) of low-paying tech jobs. To address the shortfall in technical workers, it is critical to engage women as they are half the workforce.

Talent and Workforce Strategy
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McKinsey & Company: The Hidden Toll of Workplace Incivility

A troubling research trend reveals that incivility at work has steadily risen since 1998 and today 62% of surveyed employees report rude treatment at work at least once a month. Research confirms the adverse impacts of workplace incivility on employees who are treated rudely:
  • 47% work less
  • 66% say their performance declined
  • 78% report their commitment lessened
  • 80% lost productive work time
  • 12% left their jobs because of the rude treatment
Some solutions include not hiring toxic employees in the first place, offering training in effective communications and, above all, having leaders who show respect for employees.

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