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A collection of articles on diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy brought to you by Exponential Talent LLC.
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May 13, 2015

To advance our knowledge of diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy, we gather and share relevant articles on a weekly basis. This week, we have identified the following articles of interest.

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Diversity & Inclusion
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Braveheart Leadership Labs: White Men Leadership Study 

Highlights from the article:
  • Effectiveness Gap in D&I Leadership: White males rate their D&I effectiveness as 45% while all others rate their effectiveness at 21%, creating 24-point gap.
  • Power of Diverse Personal Relationships: White men with a diverse career advisor are twice as likely to serve in a career-advancing relationship for other diverse professionals.
  • Exclusion: 68% percent of white men report that it is unclear whether diversity efforts include them, while only 15% report concerns about diversity being a win for diverse professionals and a lose for white men.
  • Barriers to Including White Men in D&I: Diverse professionals may be concerned about how white men are included in D&I, expressing issues such as, "They are already in charge; now we're investing our limited resources in them?"
Diversity & Inclusion – Gender Focus
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Fortune: Women CEOs in the Fortune 1000: By the Numbers

51 of the Fortune 1000 companies are led by women CEOs. While only 5% of those companies are run by women, they generate 7% of the total revenue of all of the Fortune 1000, and those in the S&P 500 outperformed the rest as well.
 
What those women have in common:
  • They lead companies that are: specialty retailers; food production, products and services; and gas and electric utilities.
  • Their companies are headquartered in New York, California and Illinois.
  • Fewer than half have MBAs.
  • Their college majors were engineering, economics, accounting, business and psychology.
  • More are married and have children than the national average.
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