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A collection of articles on diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy brought to you by Exponential Talent LLC.
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November 17, 2016

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Diversity & Inclusion
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Time Inc.'s People en Español: Latina@Work

A new study of Latinas in the workforce finds that the vast majority (80%) want to be able to express their full identity at work. More Latinas than non-Hispanic women say they “dress more conservatively” and modify their hair styles to be successful at work. 51% are the first in their families to graduate from college. Challenging stereotypes, the study found that fewer Hispanic women (69%) are the main cook at home than are non-Hispanic women (78%).

Focus on Gender
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Mashable: 'Masculine Culture' in STEM Partly To Blame for Gender Gap, Study Says

Researchers at the University of Washington, Seattle, conducted a review of 1,200 papers on the topic of the greater gender gap in computer science, engineering and physics than occurs in biology, chemistry and math. They argue that inexperience with those subjects before getting into college bolsters the “brogrammer” and geek stereotypes that keep young women from entering those fields. Further, the lack in technology of women in leadership and as popular cultural emblems for the field exacerbates the masculine stereotype.

World Economic ForumGender Gap Report 2016

 
The 2016 World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report puts numbers to progress on reducing gender disparities in health, education, economy and politics. It found in “economic participation,” the gap has been widening, rather than narrowing, since 2013, and has now reverted to the 2008 level.  By its calculation, if trends continue, the global economic gender gap will not close for 170 years. In the US alone, attaining gender parity could add up to $1.2 trillion in GDP.

Brookings: Diversity is a Reason for Optimism

Brookings' demographer Dr. William H. Fey writes that young minorities in the US will drive the drive the labor force to grow more than 5% by 2030 where, without them, the labor force would decline by 8%. He calls on supporting these young minorities in entering and succeeding at work.
 

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