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A collection of articles on diversity, inclusion, and workforce and talent strategy brought to you by Exponential Talent LLC.
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July 29, 2016

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Diversity & Inclusion
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Harvard Business Review: Why Diversity Programs Fail and How to Make them Succeed

The least effective diversity approaches are the ones that try to control manager and employee behavior. For example, studies show mandatory diversity training can activate bias instead of reducing it. Successful diversity programs apply 3 basic principles: engage managers in solving the problem, expose them to people from different groups, and encourage social accountability for change. Task forces, for instance, promote accountability; engage members who might have previously been lukewarm to diversity projects; and increase contact among the women, minorities, and white men who participate.


Harvard Business Review: Different Cultures See Deadlines Differently

While working with a cross-cultural team, take into consideration how different cultures perceive time. Is time linear, as it is in the West, or is it cyclical and endless, as it is elsewhere? “Deadlines” mean different things to different cultures.

Focus on Gender
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The Straits Times: A Different Reality Lurks Beneath Philippines' Gender-fair Image

In countries as in companies, progress on metrics may fail to capture underlying gender cultural challenges. While the Philippines ranks 9th for women’s participation in the economy, only half of working-age women are in the labor force, compared to 80% for men. Also, the gender pay gap and poverty are still significant women’s issues that need to be addressed.


Harvard Business Review: Getting More Black Women into the C-Suite

According to research by Marshall and Wingfield at the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), Black women are 3X more likely than white women to aspire to prestigious roles, but white women are 2X more likely to attain those roles.  

Companies can:
  • Acknowledge the unique challenges of being both a woman and Black.
  • Address lack of sponsorship for Black women, who have plenty of mentors and strong networks but lack advocates in positions of power.
  • Overcome the "identity silos" that many workplaces have, encouraging networks that bring people together to build relationships across all kinds of difference and facilitating Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) to focus on the intersections of multiple identities.
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