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Westbatonrougemuseum.com Friday, February 3rd, 2017
Lunchtime Lecture and Book Signing:
"The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike"
Tuesday, February 7th at Noon, Free
On February 7 at Noon, West Baton Rouge Museum will host a Lunchtime Lecture and Book Signing featuring author, John DeSantis on The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar  Cane Labor Strike
On November 23, 1887, white vigilantes gunned down unarmed black laborers and their families during a spree lasting more than two hours. The violence erupted due to strikes on Louisiana sugar cane plantations. Fear, rumor and white supremacist ideals clashed with an unprecedented labor action to create an epic tragedy. A future member of the U.S. House of Representatives was among the leaders of a mob that routed black men from houses and forced them to a stretch of railroad track, ordering them to run for their lives before gunning them down. According to a witness, the guns firing in the black neighborhoods sounded like a battle. 
Author and award-winning reporter John DeSantis uses correspondence, interviews and federal records to detail this harrowing true story. John DeSantis is the senior staff writer at the Times of Houma, Louisiana. A product of New York City, his work has previously appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post and other publications. A journalist whose criminal justice background was attained at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, he has covered social justice and race relations extensively in New York, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, North Carolina and California. He is also a former city editor at the Thibodaux Daily Comet. 
This program is is FREE and open to the public and is being offered in conjunction with the current exhibition, “Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963.” Visitors are welcome to bring a bag lunch to enjoy during the lecture. 
West Baton Rouge Museum Presents an Evening with Live Performances
By Bamboula 2000 and Judy Whitney Davis
Friday, February 17th from 7 - 9 pm, Free
On February 17 from 7 – 9 p.m., the West Baton Rouge Museum will host an opening reception for two traveling exhibits. This evening event will feature performances by Bamboula 2000 presenting African Drumming demonstrations and a one-woman show, “Mrs. Catherine Cornelius from Smithfield Plantation: An Ex-slave Narrative” portrayed by Judy Whitney Davis.
Bamboula 2000 is a musical force that combines dance and sound like no other group in New Orleans! The influences of the international performing group Bamboula 2000 spans three hundred years of Congo Square history and culture yet continues to innovate in the 21st century. Judy Whitney Davis is a professional singer, actress, and voice over artist. Her soulful storytelling and singing voice is sure to transcend time and bring the actual words of a local formerly enslaved woman to life.  Refreshments will be served following these two moving performances.
This event is being offered in conjunction with the current exhibitions, “Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963” and “Purchased Lives.” “Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963”  is a traveling exhibit from the National Museum of American History and the American Library Association. “Purchased Lives” is a traveling exhibition from the Historic New Orleans Collection with support from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.
This program is FREE and open to the public.
Lunchtime Lecture:
Taking on the Tough Stuff of History: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade

Tuesday, February 21st at Noon, Free
On February 21 at Noon, West Baton Rouge Museum will host a Lunchtime Lecture on “Taking on the Tough Stuff of History: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade” with Dr. Erin Greenwald.
Dr. Greenwald is the curator and historian for the Historic New Orleans Collection. She will discuss the research behind the “Purchased Lives” exhibition and the importance of grappling with the complex histories of race and slavery in the 21st century.
The exhibit, “Purchased Lives,” is a traveling exhibition from the Historic New Orleans Collection with support from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. From the colonial period and into statehood, slavery was a ubiquitous element of everyday life in New Orleans and Louisiana—affecting all parts of the local community, economy, and culture. The official end of the international slave trade, marked by the signing into law of An Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves on the second day of March 1807, dramatically altered the way slaves were bought and sold in the United States of America. In New Orleans, this meant an increase in sales of slaves brought to the city from the Upper South, and eventually the establishment of the city as a primary hub of the domestic slave trade.
This program is FREE and open to the public. Visitors are welcome to bring a bag lunch to enjoy during the lecture.
Call for Judges:
Greater Baton Rouge Regional National History Day Competition
at the West Baton Rouge Museum
Saturday, March 25th, 2017
 
The West Baton Rouge Museum is gearing up for the sixth annual Greater Baton Rouge Regional National History Day Competition to be held Saturday, March 25, 2017. At least 50 volunteers are needed to serve as judges. Judges interview middle and high school students who compete by entering a project which can be a research paper, a performance, a documentary, a website, or an exhibit. These projects are based on conclusions drawn from research using primary sources related to the 2017 theme, “Taking a Stand in History.” Students placing at this level will go on to compete at the state competition held at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans and potentially on to Nationals held in Washington, D.C. in hopes of earning cash prizes and scholarships. Judges serve on teams. Judges may be college students, professionals, or retirees who are interested in history and education, and are comfortable speaking with middle and high school age students.
Anyone interested in volunteering to serve as a judge should contact Jeannie Luckett at the West Baton Rouge Museum at 225-336-2422 Ext. 14 or at luckett@wbrmuseum.org or can contact Louisiana state coordinator, Collin Makamson at the National World War II Museum at 504-528-1944 Ext. 304,  historyday@nationalww2museum.org.
To learn more about the National History Day Contest, visit www.nhd.org or www.louisianahistoryday.org.
From the Museum Store

 
Due to the amazing response to the January sale, the Store will continue its sale into February. Selected items are marked down 25 to 60% off original prices and include books, house wares, and jewelry.  Pick up a unique item for your special someone for Valentine’s Day, like those made by our talented consignor Michelle Rowland of Vieuxtique Handcrafted Jewelry, most of which is 25% off.  Need something special for Mardi Gras, we’ve got that too.  So, stop by and peruse our unique inventory this month while enjoying a complimentary cup of coffee.

The Museum Store is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 2-5 p.m. on Sunday.  For further information about sale items or our talented consignors, call 336-2422 ext. 19 or email Gwenn at gwenn.laviolette@gmail.com.
The West Baton Rouge Museum will be closed Monday, February 27th and Tuesday February 28th for the Mardi Gras holiday
845 N. Jefferson Avenue, Port Allen, LA 70767 225-336-2422 Ext.15
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West Baton Rouge Museum · 845 N. Jefferson Ave. · Port Allen, La 70767 · USA

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