Westbatonrougemuseum.com Friday, August 5th, 2016
Georgetown University Ties to Louisiana Plantation Slavery History
Wednesday, August 10th at Noon, Free
The West Baton Rouge Museum will host a lunchtime lecture on August 10, 2016 from noon to 1pm presented by Judy Riffel. Mrs. Riffel’s presentation, “The Georgetown Memory Project: Tracing the Jesuit Slaves and their Descendants” made national news this summer when her research concluded that many Louisiana residents today have ties to enslaved laborers once owned by the prestigious private college, Georgetown University, in Washington, D.C.
 
In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 slaves to plantations in Louisiana. Slightly over 200 were transported to Louisiana and placed on three plantations in Iberville, Ascension, and Terrebonne Parishes. In 2015, friends, allies, and alumni of Georgetown University founded the Georgetown Memory Project to investigate the fate of these slaves and to try and locate living descendants. The lead genealogist for the group, Judy Riffel, will give an overview of the project, discuss the history of the three plantations where most of the Jesuit slaves were placed, and describe her work in tracing their descendants.
 
Judy Riffel is a professional genealogist in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In the fall of 2015, she was hired by the Georgetown Memory Project to trace the descendants of a group of slaves sold by Georetown Universty to plantations in Louisiana. She has also contributed to  numerous national genealogical television shows and currently appears on Roots of Faith: Ancestry, produced by the Diocese of Baton Rouge. She is an officer in the Le Comité des Archives de la Louisiane and is editor of their genealogical journal, Le Raconteur.
Bayou Pigeon, Louisiana, and the Spirit of the Atchafalaya
Wednesday, August 24th at Noon, Free
The West Baton Rouge Museum presents a local history lunchtime lecture on August 24, 2016 at noon called “Bayou Pigeon, Louisiana and the Spirit of the Atchafalaya.” The presenting local historian and author Cliff LeGrange says “There is no better way to help preserve Atchafalaya heritage today than to look at the development of the Atchafalaya Basin’s folk life.” LeGrange explains that the spirit of the basin has thrived in the community of Bayou Pigeon since as early as 1806 when travelers explored the Oak Ridge area where there were hundreds of passenger pigeons feeding and roosting, which is how the area got its name.  In this entertaining look at the rich cultural heritage of Bayou Pigeon’s history, LeGrange will share century old photographs, music, and folk stories about a region where so many Louisianan’s can trace their family roots. Patricia Landry Settoon, Adam Landry and Calvin Leblanc will co present.
Dorothea Lange and the Remarkable Legacy of the Farm Security Administration  
Wednesday, August 31st at Noon, Free 
Join the West Baton Rouge Museum on Wednesday, August 31 at Noon for a Lunch Time Lecture on documentary photographer, Dorothea Lange and the FSA Photographers featuring Claudia Kheel, Southern Regional Art Historian, Art Consultant for Neal Auction Company, and Adjunct  Professor at Tulane and Louisiana State Universities.
This program is offered in conjunction with  the exhibit Dorothea Lange’s America.  On display from August 27 through October 30, 2016, this exhibit features original lifetime prints by the legendary documentary photographer. Highlighting this show are oversized exhibition prints of her seminal portraits from the Great Depression, including White Angel Breadline, Migratory Farm Worker, and, most famously, Migrant Mother – an emblematic picture that came to personify pride and resilience in the face of abject poverty in 1930s America.
Ms. Kheel will discuss the importance of Lange’s Depression-era work and that of her contemporaries as well as Lange’s collaboration with the New Deal's Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange’s Depression-era work served in a real way to alleviate the suffering of the very people she chronicled: it raised public awareness of the dire need for federal assistance around the country, and helped convince Congress to provide it.
This lunch time lecture program is free and open to the public. Participants are welcome to bring a bag lunch.
Consignor of the Month - August
Jeremy Ballard, originally from Rhode Island, has been living in New Orleans since 2007.  He is a self-taught glass blower/maker.  Jeremy works alone to create vividly colored vases, bowls and figurines.  Finding inspiration in natural, organic forms, he has forged a style that is expressive, colorful, and often whimsical.  Jeremy was trained in the Swedish style of glass blowing.   These designs are clean and modern.  Much of Jeremy’s work also reflects an interest in experimentation and surface manipulation.   He strives to stretch the limits of his material by incorporating elements such as copper into the hot glass. He is a regular at both the Baton Rouge and New Orleans Arts Markets.  Each piece he creates is signed and truly an original work of art.   If you are looking to purchase a unique gift for the individual who has it all, Mr. Ballard’s glass designs are one of a kind.  Come by the West Baton Rouge Museum Store and peruse Mr. Ballard’s pieces and all of the other unique items on display.
 
The Museum Store is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 2-5 p.m. on Sunday.  Come in and enjoy a complimentary cup of coffee while you shop.  For further information about Jeremy Ballard or any of our other talented consignors, call 336-2422 ext. 19 or email Gwenn at gwenn.laviolette@gmail.com.
845 N. Jefferson Avenue, Port Allen, LA 70767 225-336-2422 Ext.15
West Baton Rouge Museum @WBRM Museum Podcast






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Westbatonrougemuseum.com Friday, August 5th, 2016
Georgetown University Ties to Louisiana Plantation Slavery History
Wednesday, August 10th at Noon, Free
The West Baton Rouge Museum will host a lunchtime lecture on August 10, 2016 from noon to 1pm presented by Judy Riffel. Mrs. Riffel’s presentation, “The Georgetown Memory Project: Tracing the Jesuit Slaves and their Descendants” made national news this summer when her research concluded that many Louisiana residents today have ties to enslaved laborers once owned by the prestigious private college, Georgetown University, in Washington, D.C.
 
In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 slaves to plantations in Louisiana. Slightly over 200 were transported to Louisiana and placed on three plantations in Iberville, Ascension, and Terrebonne Parishes. In 2015, friends, allies, and alumni of Georgetown University founded the Georgetown Memory Project to investigate the fate of these slaves and to try and locate living descendants. The lead genealogist for the group, Judy Riffel, will give an overview of the project, discuss the history of the three plantations where most of the Jesuit slaves were placed, and describe her work in tracing their descendants.
 
Judy Riffel is a professional genealogist in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In the fall of 2015, she was hired by the Georgetown Memory Project to trace the descendants of a group of slaves sold by Georetown Universty to plantations in Louisiana. She has also contributed to  numerous national genealogical television shows and currently appears on Roots of Faith: Ancestry, produced by the Diocese of Baton Rouge. She is an officer in the Le Comité des Archives de la Louisiane and is editor of their genealogical journal, Le Raconteur.
Bayou Pigeon, Louisiana, and the Spirit of the Atchafalaya
Wednesday, August 24th at Noon, Free
The West Baton Rouge Museum presents a local history lunchtime lecture on August 24, 2016 at noon called “Bayou Pigeon, Louisiana and the Spirit of the Atchafalaya.” The presenting local historian and author Cliff LeGrange says “There is no better way to help preserve Atchafalaya heritage today than to look at the development of the Atchafalaya Basin’s folk life.” LeGrange explains that the spirit of the basin has thrived in the community of Bayou Pigeon since as early as 1806 when travelers explored the Oak Ridge area where there were hundreds of passenger pigeons feeding and roosting, which is how the area got its name.  In this entertaining look at the rich cultural heritage of Bayou Pigeon’s history, LeGrange will share century old photographs, music, and folk stories about a region where so many Louisianan’s can trace their family roots. Patricia Landry Settoon, Adam Landry and Calvin Leblanc will co present.
Dorothea Lange and the Remarkable Legacy of the Farm Security Administration  
Wednesday, August 31st at Noon, Free 
Join the West Baton Rouge Museum on Wednesday, August 31 at Noon for a Lunch Time Lecture on documentary photographer, Dorothea Lange and the FSA Photographers featuring Claudia Kheel, Southern Regional Art Historian, Art Consultant for Neal Auction Company, and Adjunct  Professor at Tulane and Louisiana State Universities.
This program is offered in conjunction with  the exhibit Dorothea Lange’s America.  On display from August 27 through October 30, 2016, this exhibit features original lifetime prints by the legendary documentary photographer. Highlighting this show are oversized exhibition prints of her seminal portraits from the Great Depression, including White Angel Breadline, Migratory Farm Worker, and, most famously, Migrant Mother – an emblematic picture that came to personify pride and resilience in the face of abject poverty in 1930s America.
Ms. Kheel will discuss the importance of Lange’s Depression-era work and that of her contemporaries as well as Lange’s collaboration with the New Deal's Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange’s Depression-era work served in a real way to alleviate the suffering of the very people she chronicled: it raised public awareness of the dire need for federal assistance around the country, and helped convince Congress to provide it.
This lunch time lecture program is free and open to the public. Participants are welcome to bring a bag lunch.
Consignor of the Month - August
Jeremy Ballard, originally from Rhode Island, has been living in New Orleans since 2007.  He is a self-taught glass blower/maker.  Jeremy works alone to create vividly colored vases, bowls and figurines.  Finding inspiration in natural, organic forms, he has forged a style that is expressive, colorful, and often whimsical.  Jeremy was trained in the Swedish style of glass blowing.   These designs are clean and modern.  Much of Jeremy’s work also reflects an interest in experimentation and surface manipulation.   He strives to stretch the limits of his material by incorporating elements such as copper into the hot glass. He is a regular at both the Baton Rouge and New Orleans Arts Markets.  Each piece he creates is signed and truly an original work of art.   If you are looking to purchase a unique gift for the individual who has it all, Mr. Ballard’s glass designs are one of a kind.  Come by the West Baton Rouge Museum Store and peruse Mr. Ballard’s pieces and all of the other unique items on display.
 
The Museum Store is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 2-5 p.m. on Sunday.  Come in and enjoy a complimentary cup of coffee while you shop.  For further information about Jeremy Ballard or any of our other talented consignors, call 336-2422 ext. 19 or email Gwenn at gwenn.laviolette@gmail.com.
845 N. Jefferson Avenue, Port Allen, LA 70767 225-336-2422 Ext.15
West Baton Rouge Museum @WBRM Museum Podcast






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West Baton Rouge Museum · 845 N. Jefferson Ave. · Port Allen, La 70767 · USA

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