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Grow Lightly News

No. 6 
September 2015
 

IN THIS ISSUE
  • What's new in the shop?
  • Preserving workshop
  • Info about netting your orchard
  • Recipes
  • and lots of other stuff

New delights at the Food Hub

Mmm...! Home-made bread! But you need to be early. Grow Lightly’s sourdough and wholemeal bread is usually sold out by lunchtime. Sometimes baked right here at the Food Hub, and sometimes in local farmhouse kitchens, there is a big demand for this delicious bread. To be sure of your loaf, you can order ahead – ring 5655 2893.
Local milk is now also available, in the form many people prefer – pasteurised but not homogenised. At this stage only whole milk, but once we work out what people would like, and how much, we can extend the range. It comes from Bass River Dairies on the Bass Highway at Bass. Grow Lightly’s range of local cheeses and yoghurt, together with local honey, preserves, muesli and in-season fruit, means you can pick up all the makings for a very fine breakfast at the Food Hub.
Grow Lightly will also shortly be offering Mirboo Pastured Poultry in its freezer, so lunch and dinner can be covered as well! Please let us know what cuts you would prefer.
 
Spring has arrived
With the cold, windy weather we’ve been having, it’s hard to believe it’s really Spring – but the fruit trees know, and are out in blossom. And the asparagus is up, a sure sign of warmer weather. The Food Hub should have supplies of local certified organic asparagus right through until Christmas. New season local avocadoes are also available now.
One of our most reliable suppliers is Cafresco Organics at Kooweerup. Maurie, Maria, Brian and other knowledgeable and cheerful helpers keep us supplied throughout the year with gorgeous, certified organic produce. Here is a picture of some of what's available at the moment.

GROW LIGHTLY WORKSHOPS

Grow Lightly’s latest community workshop brought together 15 or so people interested in setting up or improving their backyard orchards. With some local growers on hand to talk about their experiences, the group discussed such issues as, finding the most suitable spot on your land to plant an orchard; drainage and wind protection; trees that grow well in southern Gippsland;  netting the orchard; soil management and pest control.

Here are some notes on netting your orchard from Sid Cowling - thankyou Sid.

NETTING AN ORCHARD
  1. Measure out and mark location of poles, strainer assemblies,  gate posts, etc
  2. Dig holes
  3. Cut grooves in top of poles.
  4. Stand up poles, ensure corner posts are vertical and install strainer assemblies where cables not going over a corner pole to an anchor, ramming poles and strainer posts.
  5. Intermediate poles which will have a steel pipe brace left  unrammed.
  6. Distance between the poles to have steel pipe braces measured and pipe cut to size (allowing for extra inches where they slot into poles.
  7. Measure height up pole to steel pipe location and drill shallow hole, ensuring steel pipes will be horizontal.
  8. Drape cable over top of poles along four sides, allowing for three cable clamps at each end of a run of cable.
  9. Drill holes at an angle and install deck spikes in poles or anchor posts where cable will terminate.
  10. Finish off cable ends, with turnbuckle at one end of each cable.
  11. Drape cable across poles which will have steel pipe braces; prepare cable ends as above; carefully locate steel pipes in shallow holes already drilled above.
  12. Progressively tighten cables with turnbuckles, relocating cable clamps as necessary.
  13. Ram all posts, especially the intermediate ones which should now be vertical.
  14. Where there is a long steel pipe brace, may wish to support midway with simple post/pole/pipe.
  15. Install gate posts and top rails over gateways.
  16. Position plastic pole caps on each pole, ensure there is plastic cap or whatever on all strainer posts, gate posts,  etc to minimise abrasion of net.
  17. Prune well down any trees which will be close to the roof or side nets.
  18. Measure out roofing net, which may also come down the ends; add a margin for stretching and fitting; cut net to length.
  19. Thread plain fencing wire along long edges of the net.
  20. Drape roof net over top cables and attach fencing wire to cable with plastic clips about every metre or two, not too close to poles to enable fine adjustment as net is tensioned up.
  21. Stretch roof net, including down both ends; thread fencing wire along bottom net of ends and clip to wire along ground or fence.
  22. Clip wire to cable along edges of roof every few inches to ensure no gaps for birds.
  23. Affix plastic  clamps along net/cable where roof net comes down at ends.
  24. Measure side net, add a margin for stretching and fitting; cut net to length.
  25. Thread fencing wire along edges; clip wire to top cable as before; stretch to fit; add extra clips so no gaps.
  26. Clip bottom wire to fence or whatever.
  27. Using fencing wire where necessary, clip all edges of nets at corners, etc to ensure there are no gaps.
  28. Hang gates.
  29. Cut net around gateways, leaving a veil of about 300 mm hanging down over top of gate, and fix to gate posts, again ensuring no gaps.
  30. Stand back and admire.
THE NEXT GROW LIGHTLY WORKSHOP WILL BE ON PRESERVING YOUR HARVEST USING THE FOWLERS VACOLA METHOD.
PRESENTER - SUSAN DAVIES

One of life’s joys in the cold dark days of winter is opening up a bottle of summer sunshine in the form of perfectly preserved peaches or cherries. Have you ever wanted to put up your own preserves but didn’t know how?
Join us for a workshop covering information about equipment and where to buy it, selecting the best fruit to bottle, techniques for success, ensuring safety of your products etc.

Call Carmel on 0488 740 557 if you have any questions.
Booking is essential - through www.eventbrite.com.au . Once you're in, look up Grow Lightly.

From my garden


The garden doesn't look as productive as it should - the last few weeks have been a case of do what I say and not what I do. But we do have lots of splendid rainbow chard, Red Russian kale, everlasting lettuce and Rouge d'hiver (sounds more impressive than Winter Red), still a few purple carrots and Cylindrica beetroot, and the last of theTromboncino squash/pumpkin. Different sorts of perennial onions, leeks and garlic are coming on nicely, though they won't be ready for a couple of months yet.
Snow peas are up and searching for their trellis, and I've just dug the last of the yacon and oca. 
So the garden is alive and happening - and what's even more exciting is the birds. Everywhere. Mostly nesting.
Swallows in the shed; grey shrike thrushes on the verandah; scrub wrens, thornbills and blue wrens almost everywhere you look; crimson and eastern rosellas, even some king parrots; a red wattlebird feeding newly fledged babies just above my head on the path to the garden ...  
And an occasional day of warmth to keep the humans happy.
Cheers
Meredith  
What should I do with -
Kale
We've had three different kinds of kale in the shop and the vegiebags recently: Tuscan or Dinosaur kale (the heavily blistered one); green curly kale (it looks very green and curly) and Red Russian (beautiful blue-green leaves that go limp more quickly than the other two). They are all members of the cabbage family, but do need a bit of cooking. Steam or stir-fry.
Cauliflower

Make soup!
Cook your cauliflower with a leek, a carrot or two, and a couple of potatoes. Add chicken stock, and a dash of olive oil.  Puree a lot, a little or not at all depending on how chunky you like your soup. 
Jerusalem Artichokes
Make more soup!
Roast them with a few cloves of garlic and a potato or two. When they're cooked, add salt and puree. Then add vegie stock for desired creaminess.

Thanks to our shop customers for the tips above.
Thank you, IGA shoppers!
We are most grateful to have received this year’s cheque from Michael’s Supa IGA. People who shop at Michael’s IGA supermarkets in Leongatha and Korumburra, and who donate their customer loyalty points to Grow Lightly, make it possible – thank you all so much! Please, all our supporters out there who shop in Korumburra or Leongatha, please consider joining the Michael’s IGA community rewards scheme and nominating Grow Lightly as the local group you wish to support.  Michael’s Supa IGA have given more than a million dollars over the years to local community groups.
Grow Lightly will use this year’s cheque for improvements and equipment in our community kitchen.
To join the community rewards scheme, there are application forms at the Food Hub; or talk to staff at either of the IGA supermarkets.
GROW LIGHTLY AGM 2015
THIS YEAR'S AGM WILL BE HELD ON 25 OCTOBER. EVERYONE IS WELCOME, BUT ONLY MEMBERS OF GROW LIGHTLY CONNECT, WHO ARE PEOPLE WHO PLAY AN ACTIVE VOLUNTEER ROLE IN THE ORGANISATION, ARE ENTITLED TO VOTE. BOARD MEMBERS WILL BE ELECTED OR REAPPOINTED AT THIS MEETING.
Copyright © 2015 Grow Lightly Connect, All rights reserved.


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