Copy
Newsletter Number 4 2016
View this email in your browser
Welcome to our December newsletter! I hope you are winding down for the festive 
season – with time to get into some books. Jay Heale gives us an overview of his 
reading in 2016  – coincidentally mentioning three books we highlight in our reviewing 
section. He also gives us a vignette of his new life in Napier, a small farming town a 
few hours’ drive from Cape Town.  Lona Gericke has chipped in with her choice of her 
favourite Afrikaans books of the year. 

Our featured reading project is Cape Town’s Pillars of Support whose focus is migrant 
children.  I was introduced last year to the project by assistant editor Neil Goodwin, 
human rights officer at the NPO Scalabrini. Many of you might know Neil’s alter ego, 
Charlie X, who uses mime and humour in his activism on behalf of marginalised people 
and in his protests against abuses of power.  (For more on Neil see News 24's
Beautiful News from December 3.)

                                   
                                                 Charlie X and Santa

Major news since our last letter is the announcement of the tenth annual Maskew Miller  
Longman Literature Awards – this year for teen novels. Charmaine Kendal, author of 
Miscast our 2016 List of Honour Books choice, won the MML English award for her 
new adventure novel Leopard Calling (See Kathy Madlener’s review below).  Amazingly, 
this year a 14 year old writer Almé Hugo won an award for her Afrikaans novel.  
(See below for photo & list of the winners.) More good news is that two South Africans,
Lori-Ann Preston and Venessa Scholtz, were winners in the Golden Baobab 2016 
competition for African children’s books (info@goldenbaobab.org).  

Yesterday was South Africa’s annual Day of Reconciliation, a day set aside in our new 
democracy in 1995 to foster understanding across our divided society. 2016 has been 
an uncomfortable year – bringing  sharp awareness of our inequities and divisions. The 
on-going unequal access to books and libraries is one indicator of the discrimination 
against millions of South African children. Our workshop early next year with PRAESA  
Literacy and Literature will I hope examine what needs to be done across our schools 
to spread  the joys and value of reading.  IBBY SA’s ongoing Schools Programme is 
a small contribution towards filling some gaps. We are grateful to the Yamada Bee 
Company for their generous funding of our 2016 project which, we hear, is already 
making a difference in 14 under-resourced primary schools in rural 
KwaZulu –Natal (see photo below). 

We have just had our first IBBY Christmas and New Year greeting – from IBBY 
New Zealand.  This reminds me of the vibrant congress in Auckland and my debt of
thanks to Liz Page for the  contribution from IBBY for my registration fee and 
accommodation.  

More thanks are owed to the over-stretched IBBY SA executive for their hard 
work and support. After his bout of ill-health, it’s great to see Robin back to his 
energetic self and overseeing our List of Honour Books processes.  Special thanks 
are due to Neil for his work on the newsletters, to Theresa, Kate and Jurgen  for their 
efforts in revamping our web site,  to Jean and Sunitha of Biblionef for their work on 
our Schools’ Programme, and to Kathy for her breathing new life into our reviewing  
programme. 

May you all have a very merry (and bookish) Christmas and/or holiday time!

Genevieve Hart
      
HAPPY READING FROM JAY HEALE
                                                                                                                 

One gets a bit cut off from books, here in the wilds of the Overberg. More 
about that in a moment. I am increasingly reliant on publishers’ blurbs and review 
copies – two wildly erratic sources!  The best piece of writing for young people I have 
read all year has been THE SMELL OF OTHER PEOPLE’S HOUSES by 
Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock (from Faber). 

 

My thanks to Jerusha at The Book Lounge for bringing it to my attention. As
I said somewhere in one of my Bookchat issues, it’s so fresh. With the 
unusual setting of the Alaskan border, it’s a tale of colliding teenagers and
their varied homes and families. To be enjoyed by adults as sheer wake-up 
stuff with plenty of humour and lots of lively observation.

In the non-fiction area (and I read masses of that), I treasure THE SILK ROADS 
by Peter Frankopan (Bloomsbury). 



It’s a heavy-weight, as you would expect “A New History of the World” to be.
My own school-induced reading taught that England was the focus of all the
history that mattered – as medieval minds (and map-makers) fixed on
Jerusalem as the centre of the world. Frankopan explains, lucidly and with
persuasive interest, that the history of our world is really centred much
farther to the east.

South African youth literature.

During the year I have received only 25 local books for review, and not all 
of those originated in South Africa. Here (in alphabetical order by title) 
are the ones that impressed me the most.

Picture Books

DUDU’S BASKET by Dianne Stewart, illustrated by Elizabeth Pulles (Jacana) -
a lightly told tale by an author who knows how to craft a story. 

I AM ALEX by Elena Agnello, illustrated by Adrie le Roux (Bumble Books) - 
fun, with the clear message that all of us (however strange) can be friends.

 

MR HARE MEETS MR MANDELA by Chris van Wyk,
illustrated by Paddy Bouma (Jacana) – 
originally in a collection from the Sunday Times, a new solo book containing the 
author’s final, light-hearted gift to us, and lovely pictures. 



NOMBULULO AND THE MOTH by Susie Dinneen, illustrated by Maja Serada 
(Puffin 2016) – 
visually enchanting, spiritually comforting (after a death), with plenty 
to explore in words and pictures. 

THE AFRICAN ORCHESTRA by Wendy 
Hartmann & Joan Rankin (Jacana) – words and pictures about the sounds 
of Africa. Unusual and brilliant for reading aloud. 

 

THE ELEPHANTS ARE COMING! by Lindsay Norman, 
illustrated by Izak Vollgraaff (Struik Children) – 
a surprise of a picture-story, full of genuine Africa, with some real-life 
photos as well.

Novels for young readers

ELEVATION 1: THE THOUSAND STEPS by Helen Brain (Human & Rousseau) – first 
of a SF trilogy on dystopian possibilities in a flooded Cape. PLAY-MAKER by Jayne 
Bauling (Cover2Cover) – a really good soccer story, involving convincingly real people. 



SNITCH by Edyth Bulbring (Tafelberg) – peer-pressures at high school level, first in 
the rugby world, then in loyalty to school society’s unwritten code of conduct. 

THE RULES by Dianne Case (Cover2Cover) – another welcome youth novel from 
an experienced author who doesn’t pull punches. Rich/poor; Christian/Muslim; how 
does our mixed society work? Or doesn’t it?



THERE SHOULD HAVE BEEN FIVE by MJ Honikman (Tafelberg) – a dip back into a slice of South African military history which deserves wider recognition.

Jay Heale

                             
JAY ON LIFE IN NAPIER

There’s an unexpectedly rewarding second-hand bookshop (called Greta’s Place), 
several good eateries, a pub (The Fox) recently re-opened which has excellent draught 
beer, a petrol station, a post office (open mornings only, Monday to Friday), a bank 
(open one day a week), several café-groceries, too many curio shops, plenty of places 
for morning coffee, and Vindigo, a rewarding emporium of local wines. Plus a 
Retirement Village where I live in comfort and good company, with my health attended 
to when required.

                             

No theatre, no cinema, no Chinese take-away or KFC, no supermarket, no pharmacy
(go 13 km to Bredasdorp for the last two), but surrounded with ever-changing wide-open 
countryside. Birds, winds, fynbos and renosterveld, a surprising number of wineries, 
and the sea within reach. The air is clean. No parking restrictions. And hurray for email
which keeps me in touch with my friends around the world – even if it does take an hour 
and a half to get to the nearest Woolies!

Jay Heale 
jayheale@afrihost.co.za
LONA GERICKE’S TOP THREE BOOKS OF 2016 

Liewe Heksie en die Silwer Roos( H&R,2016) Gebaseer op die
oorspronklike verhale deur Verna Vels met illustrasies deur Vian Oelofsen. 


Wat ‘n pragtige huldeblyk aan Verna Vels is hierdie groot formaat goudkleurige 
boek nie!  Liewe Heksie staan lekker groot met die Silwer Roos in ‘n pot teen 
die goue agtergrond, terwyl ‘n gifappeltjie hande uitsteek na die begeerlike roos.

Die Silwer Roos is Blommeland se kosbaarste blom en moet soos goud 
bewaar word, want as dit moet wegraak sal al die blomme doodgaan en koning 
Rosekrans en sy kabouters en Heksie sonder ‘n blyplek wees. 

Daarom kry  Heksie die opdrag om die blom op te pas want die gifappeltjies wil
die Roos steel.
 
Sal Heksie daarin slaag, of moet Griet die getoorde perd tot haar hulp kom? 
Liewe Heksie vertel mos ander hekse toor paddas en muisvlerre- vlermuise- 
maar sy toor vir Griet!

Liewe Heksie is mos maar geneig om te vergeet en goedertrou op te tree!

Die mooiste mooiste boek! Vian Oelofsen laat die verhaaltjie blom en skyn en 
die leser betower met vrolike geel blomme, ‘n reuse perd, en hier die mooiste 
Silwer Roos ooit.  Die kleure van die agtergrond op elke bladsy is slim gekies
sodat die illustrasies mooi vertoon en nog treffender is. Hoogs aanbeveel 
as ‘n ware kunswerk en defnitief vir elke skool, huis en biblioteek 
versameling.



Jacobs, Jaco: Moenie hierdie boek eet nie! ‘n rympie vir elke dag van 
die jaar (LAPA, 2016)Illustrasies deur Zinelda McDonald.


Jacobs is al bekend vir sy rympieboeke vir kleintjies. In hardeband verskyn 
hierdie prag uitgawe – 312 bladsye met rympies vir elke maand van die jaar. In 
Januarie rym hy oor nuwejaarsvoornemens, die eerste skooldag en selfs 
Gorgonzola:”Dit ruik erger as erg, dit ruik vrotter as vrot, dit ruik byna soos iets 
wat woon in ‘n grot”…Februarie bring ‘n rympie oor ‘n spook in die skool se
toilet; Maart vertel van as die maan ‘n pizza was  en teen Desember vertel hy 
dat sy pa rowwer is as jou pa:” My pa springtou met ‘n ratelslang, My pa kan
‘n leeu met sy kaal hande vang….hy is bang vir net mooi niks..behalwe my 
ma”!

McDonald se illustrasies is modern, verbeeldingryk, vol humor en maak ‘n groot 
bydrae tot die algehele gevoel van ‘n puik produksie. Haaar werk kan vergelyk 
met van die beste internasionale bundels wat ek al beoordeel het. 



Wasserman, Elizabeth: Elf dae in Parys( Tafelberg, 2016)

Vir 11-14jariges wat ‘n storie met meer lyf soek, sal hierdie elf dae in Parys 
genoeg bevrediging gee. 

Nie net doen die skrywer moeite om baie inligting oor Parys –die kunsmuseums 
en ander besienswaardighede by te voeg nie,maar ook skets sy hier ‘n onverwagte 
avontuur wat Emma en haar vriende lekker onkant vang.

Haar ouma Hebsodemma moedig haar aan om die elf dae in die wintervakansie 
die skooltoer mee te maak.

Juffrou Lategan die Franse juffrou is hul chaperone. Die twee meisies wat sy 
ken is Tombisa-die eksotiese Afrika prinses, en Clarissa, die klas se flerrie. 

Haar ouma se geskenk is ‘n sagte sakkie van swart fluweel met ‘n rekbandjie 
wat sy moet gebruik om alles in te bêre wat sy veilig wil bewaar. Hulle gaan tuis 
by Mevrou Flaubert by wie hulle ook Franse klasse gaan loop. Haar seun  Luc is
hulle kelner. 

Met haar eerste besoek aan die Musée d’Orsay  verskyn ‘n houer met heuning  
in haar rugsak; en  haar ouma dring aan dat sy na die standbeeld van die 
sater en sy beertjies moet gaan kyk- ‘n fyn lyn tussen droom en werklikheid
begin vorm aanneem vir Emma. Phillibert die sater vertel haar dat sy een van 
die drie Muse is. Tombisa en die vioolspeler Kimiri is die ander twee. Hulle 
moet die drie sleutels kry om die krag van kuns vir die stad oop te sluit- visuele 
kuns, letterkunde en musiek.Een maal elke honders jaar moet die Muse die 
sleutels in ‘n spesiale seremonie aan die burgermeester oorhandig. Die ritueel 
hernu die betowering van Parys vir besoekers. :Die seremonie van die Honderd 
jaar Hernuwing. Die sleutels hou ‘n groot aantrekkingskrag in vir ander rolspelers 
wat ook hierby betrokke wil wees. En nou is die sleutels weg. Gaan Emma en 
haar vriende daarin slaag om die sleutels betyds op te spoor?

‘n Gewone skooltoer verander in  ‘n aksie belaaide  avontuur met agtervolgings, 
gemene rampokkers en allerhande verassings om elke draai! Om nie te vergeet 
van al die inligting oor Parys en die moontlikheid van ‘n romanse vir Emma nie.

Wie sou nou kon dink dat elf dae in Parys soveel moontlikhede bied vir die leser
om defnitief met nuwe oë na Parys te kyk! Hoogs aanbeveel.

Lona Gericke
                              

South Africa has about one million refugees and asylum seekers – so perhaps
it is time that IBBY SA highlighted the reading needs of their children. Many 
classrooms across South Africa have pockets of migrant children who fall behind, 
as they lack skills in the languages that surround them. Given their large classes 
and lack of resources, our teachers often struggle to cater for their special needs. 
Roger Mukadi’s organisation Pillars of Support recognises that the ability to read 
fluently for meaning is the most important factor in learning across the curriculum.
Its weekend reading and writing groups, based at Chapel Hill Primary in Observatory
Cape Town, bring together 50 children scattered across the city. Their schools report 
that the project is already having a positive impact. 

                            

On meeting Roger through the migrant advocacy NPO Scalabrini and seeing his bare 
shelves, I proposed to Biblionef that we include Pillars of Support in our 2017 
Schools Programme funding proposal. If all goes well, we will be enriching the lives 
of the children with a core collection of attractive story books – which they will be 
able to take home each week. Of course the fundamental aim is to improve 
reading skills. But just as importantly, we believe that the books will bring some
joy to the lives of the migrant children and perhaps help them make sense of their 
new lives.

For more information on Pillars of Support contact Roger.   

Genevieve Hart

                         

                        


The annual MML competition gives equal weight to all South African languages - 
based on  Pearson’s stated  “commitment to developing quality literature in all 
official languages for young readers”.  

The 2016 winners were:  
Helena Barnard for Gramadoelas! (Afrikaans)
Charmaine Kendal for Leopard Calling (English). (See Review section)
Zukiswa Pakama for Akulahlwa Mbeleko Ngakufelwa (IsiXhosa)
Mbongeni Cyprian Nzimande for Ayixoxeki Nakuxoxeka (IsiZulu)
Musa Aubrey Baloyi for Vutlhari Bya Lunya (Xitsonga). 

                 
      
                                  

We are grateful to the Yamada Bee Company for their generous 
funding of our 2016 project which, we hear, is already making 
a difference in 14 under-resourced schools in rural
KwaZulu –Natal. 


                      
                                            Matheku Secondary School, KZN
                 BOOK REVIEWS
                                       Kathy Madlener, reviewing coordinator 

I would like to thank all the publishers who have sent us copies of their 
publications this year and we look forward to more great titles in 2017.  I am 
also delighted to welcome a group of new reviewers to our IBBY review team, 
I will introduce them over the next few months.  One of the first to reply to our 
appeal  was Heather Davidson. Heather is a member of IBBY SA and has been 
an avid reader all her life. Nowadays she spends her evenings reading to many
children while babysitting, reliving the joy of her favourite children's books. She has recently self-published her first children's picture book - The Choo Choo Park.  
Kate Whittaker, member of our executive committee, is also a first time IBBY SA 
reviewer.  Trained as a librarian, she has wide knowledge of children’s publishing, 
having worked in well-known book shops in the UK. 


Pinguilly, Yves.  The Big flower /  illustrated by Maja Sereda. Tafelberg, 2016.
 
It’s Palesa and Dylan’s first day of pre-school; they walk to school through the 
streets of Johannesburg with Palesa’s daddy. On the way they pass a tiny house 
with a tiny garden; in the garden is a Big Flower that seems to greet them as they 
pass. After a day of school activities the children return home with Dylan’s daddy and 
pass the Big Flower again. This time she is turned away from them, following the 
path of the sun.  This is how the Big Flower says goodnight.

The illustrations in this book are beautifully done; they are full of interesting scenes 
of city life with details such as Palesa’s dog following the children to school and a 
sleepy bee on the Big Flower.

One comment I have is that the end of the school day is referred to as “mommy time” 
which jarred a little especially as the children were being collected by a Daddy. 
This book is translated so I think perhaps this is a French concept that didn’t translate 
well to a South African phrase.

Heather Davidson 


Ellison, Peet. Timbertwig’s new adventures.  Human & Rousseau, 2016.

Timbertwig lives with his granny in Wiggly Wood Forest; Abigail – a magic 
spider – lives in his hat. Abigail has good intentions but invariably her spells 
go a little wrong and cause a series of complications that the two friends have 
to sort out together. The four stories included in the book contain colourful 
characters and are based on original situations such as Timbertwig’s eyebrows 
disappearing, a flea circus coming to town and a lost baby star falling to earth. 
This book has colourful illustrations on each page which I feel will hold a child’s
interest very effectively.  An audio CD accompanies the book; the stories are 
read by Susanne Beyers who uses different voices for each character, bringing 
the story vividly to life. 

Heather Davidson


Brain, Helen. Elevation 1: The thousand steps.  Human & Rousseau, 2016

Grounded in a drowned post-apocalyptic world, the first part of Helen Brain’s 
Elevation series blends myth and futuristic dystopian fiction in a fast-moving 
initiation tale. From its dramatic opening, Elevation: The Thousand Steps 
draws the reader into the protagonist sixteen-year-old Ebba’s complex journey 
to discover her history and forge her future. We travel with her as she is 
elevated from the underground bunker to live on her family’s farm above the 
ground on Table Island. Emerging from the colony deep within Table Mountain, 
she is propelled into the role of land owner in a strange society where she has
to learn new rules to survive before those, with more cunning and a darker purpose, 
determine her future.  Can she save herself and her friends? How can she navigate 
the rough seas of emotion as she is swept along by the desire to belong and 
find love? Who can she trust? What is the meaning of her unique birthmark 
and what mysterious powers does her necklace contain? All of these questions 
and more are evoked as Helen Brain’s strongly drawn characters come to life 
and carry us along in the first part of this trilogy. Packed with tension and 
cleverly woven glimpses into Ebba’s past which forecast her future, this 
uniquely South African youth novel leaves one anticipating further cosmic 
adventures. 

Kate Whittaker 



Kendal, Charmaine.  Leopard calling.  Maskew Miller Longman, 2016.

This exciting , if fairly predictable, adventure story is set in the Western 
Cape town of Citrusdal, close to the rugged Cederberg Mountains.  We 
meet 17 year old Sharma in the middle of the night as she prepares to flee
from the home that she shares with her mother and cruel stepfather, Hendrik.
Lonely and afraid she hides out in a cave in the Cederberg Mountains where 
her special connection  with animals and her affinity with nature help her to 
survive. One day, on a brief visit to town,  she sees an advert for a job at an 
animal shelter , Vincent recognises her “ Animal Kin, and hires. Here she 
finds refuge, support and romance.

Sethu, who works at the shelter, becomes suspicious of her behaviour, he 
doesn’t trust her and realises she is hiding something important and dangerous. 
The story races along and Sharma must take huge risks to help the leopards and 
uncover the truth behind her stepfather.

This is book is clearly aimed at schools: at the back is a study guide with 
discussions on themes, character development , pre reading questions and 
questions on all the chapters among other teaching aids. I am not a fan of this 
as it makes the novel feel like a textbook but I can see the value to teachers.
Simple language, short chapters, well chosen font size, themes of conservation, 
especially related to leopard, a touch of magical realism and the chemistry 
between Sharma and Sethu should make this book appealing to even the 
most reluctant readers. 

Many people judge a book by its cover.  I am not sure that this cover, a photograph 
of a leopard’s head,  will appeal to  young adults who in my experience, seem to
like covers of other young teens.

This book has been awarded the winner of the 2016 MML prize for literature.

Kathy Madlener


Bulbring, Edyth.  Snitch. Tafelberg, 2016

Thirteen year old Ben Smith, alias Snitch, has an excellent, trustworthy, 
compatible relationship with his single parent Mom and (sometimes) boyfriend 
Uncle Charles. They have always been able to openly discuss the issues 
experienced in growing up through his primary years. However, during his first 
year in high school this changes considerably. 

Edyth Bulbring has her finger on the pulse of young teenagers as she records 
the eighteen rules from Snitch about what will have to change through puberty. 
Tackling the changes in her approach to clothing, Snitch warns his readers
that mother’s choice of clothing at the wrong time can be too embarrassing for 
words. Allowing her to choose one’s clothes as in early childhood and then
marking them for easy identification can be disastrous.

He warns of the various obstacles of communication and warns his readers 
not to allow Mom to look at Facebook messages; talking to teachers and 
then trying to fight his battles when problems arise can do more harm than 
good. Girlfriends are a personal matter and it is not necessary for Mum 
to answer calls, make dates and then to interrogate him after the event.
His emphasises that Mums can be embarrassing. Going shopping and 
going to the doctor are out! 

No longer is it necessary for Mum to control his finances. And very 
definitely, he is too old for goodnight cuddles.  Finally, he comes 
to the conclusion that life is complicated and that there are some things 
that Mom need never know.

In a light-hearted manner, Bulbring offers some serious advice to her 
readers.  For those old enough to remember Adrian Mole, 
aged 13 ¾ , this is a case of move over Adrian....here comes Snitch.
Recommended!

Audrey Hitchcock
Copyright © 2016 IBBY SA - THE INTERNATIONAL BOARD ON BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE SOUTH AFRICA, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
IBBY SA - THE INTERNATIONAL BOARD ON BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE SOUTH AFRICA
Box 847, Howard Place, 7450 South Africa
Cape Town, Wc 7450
South Africa



Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

 






This email was sent to luzmaria.stauffenegger@ibby.org
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
IBBY SA - THE INTERNATIONAL BOARD ON BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE SOUTH AFRICA · Box 847, Howard Place, 7450 South Africa · Cape Town, WC 7450 · South Africa

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp