Copy
ISSUE #15  |  April 22, 2020
THE ORGANICS RECYCLING AUTHORITY
IN THIS ISSUE
 Lessons In
Community Composting
:
Business Focus
And Structure
 
 
Business Focus And Structure
Determining focus generally starts by seeing a need in the community and wanting to provide a solution. The structure supports your overall mission and enables it to scale over time. Plus a COVID-19 update. Part II

By Molly Lindsay


The second installment in this series, “Lessons in Community Composting,” covers business structure and focus. I spoke to five community composters from around the country to learn about their operations and find out how they got their start.
 
Determining focus generally starts for most by seeing a need in the community and wanting to provide a solution, whether that be collecting food scraps from residents and businesses, starting a zero waste events service, or training people to produce compost. It’s also dependent on the landscape of your area. Is there a saturation of haulers or processors? Will you have access to a location to compost or can you lease land? What are the restrictions in your area for composting or permits for hauling food scraps?

 
Digesting Dumped Milk,
RNG For Sea-Tac
The last week has been chock full of anaerobic digestion and biogas news. This roundup includes tips for adding COVID-caused unsold milk to digesters and the latest on a major airport becoming a major RNG offtaker.

By Nora Goldstein



“Digesting Dumped Dairy.” That was the title of an April 15 webinar hosted by the American Biogas Council (ABC), which featured Steve Dvorak, DVO, Inc., Craig Frear, Regenis, Bernie Sheff, Montrose Environmental, Bryan Sievers, AgriReNew/Sievers Family Farm and Patrick Serfass, ABC. The presenters addressed a range of topics that included:
• Why are dairies dumping milk?
• How does milk change digester chemistry and biology?
• Operational challenges and anaerobic digestion system optimization
• Latest news on the consequences of digesting milk on D3/D5 RINs categorization

New Jersey Governor Signs Food Waste Mandate

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed the food waste recycling mandate passed by the state legislature on March 5. A2371/S865 requires recycling of food waste by “large food waste generators” (i.e., certain commercial and institutional entities that produce at least 52 tons/year of preconsumer food waste). 

COVID-19 Budget Cuts Cause Temporary Suspension Of NYC Organics Collection

The New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) announced on April 17 that, due to COVID-19 budget cuts, it is suspending the voluntary curbside composting program for food scraps and yard trimmings, beginning May 4, 2020. DSNY is continuing its mandatory curbside collection of recycled materials. During the suspension, any food scraps and yard trimmings set out for composting will be collected as trash. The suspension is currently planned through June 30, 2021.

Many Ways To Celebrate Compost
In 2020

Environmental and recycling businesses, organizations, community groups and individuals around the U.S. are making plans to celebrate the annual International Compost Awareness Week (ICAW), May 3-9, 2020. Traditionally, ICAW is promoted by holding group activities and events.

 
Irrigation + Compost Math
How much does adding compost to production agriculture soils reduce irrigation needs? Let’s do the math.
Part V.
2

 
Part 1 of Part V of our Drawdown series tackled the topic of irrigation, and laid the groundwork for Part 2, where we will do the math to calculate actual potential reductions in irrigation due to amending soils with recycled organics. Part 1 (aka Part V.1) covered the fundamentals of irrigation, reviewed key findings in the literature on carbon and water savings associated with efficient irrigation systems, and highlighted data on increased soil organic matter and water holding and infiltration capacity of the amended soil.
 
In Part 2, we take this knowledge and apply it to the drawdown of carbon, in particular for California. Drawdown (the project) focused on expensive, highly efficient irrigation.  Most high value agriculture in California already uses this type of irrigation.  Almonds and grapes are prime examples.  In addition to the high value stuff, California also has plenty of acres in less intensive agriculture.  Wheat and hay cover close to 25% of the harvested acreage in the state.  Rangeland covers an additional 10 million acres. 
THE ORGANICS RECYCLING AUTHORITY
Founding Publisher
Jerome Goldstein

Editor
Nora Goldstein

Publisher
Rill Ann Goldstein Miller

Associate Publisher
Ina Pincus

Senior Editor
Craig Coker
Senior Adviser
Sally Brown, University Of Washington

Contributing Editors
Ana Carvalho, Peter Gorrie,
Michael H. Levin, Robert Spencer

Advertising Director
Teri Sorg-McManamon

Art Director
Doug Pinkerton

Administrative Assistant
Celeste Madtes
FOR EDITORIAL INQUIRIES, EMAIL NORA GOLDSTEIN

FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES, EMAIL TERI SORG-MCMANAMON
THE JG PRESS, INC., PUBLISHER OF BIOCYCLE CONNECT & BIOCYCLE.NET  |  P.O. BOX 248  |  EMMAUS, PA 18049 USA
THIS EMAIL WAS SENT TO <<Email Address>>
UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THIS LIST  |  UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION PREFERENCES
You are receiving this email because of your interest in BioCycle, The Organics Recycling Authority and BioCycle CONNECT. https://biocycle.us9.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=15ff803f299bba82404882b28&id=8396f01c15&e=[UNIQID]&c=e44756fd81 The JG Press, Inc., publisher of BioCycle CONNECT P.O. Box 248 Emmaus, PA 18049-3755 USA Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp http://www.mailchimp.com/email-referral/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=referral_marketing&aid=15ff803f299bba82404882b28&afl=1 Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp